AMERICAN AGITPROP

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Socio-cultural myth and the problem of American exceptionalism

by Brett I. Kier | 8 September 2016

Associated colloquially with the Special Snowflake Syndrome, American exceptionalism has permeated the minds of its citizens since The Founding. And for all of America’s imperial ambitions, its root hog, or die attitude will not likely cause it to outlast or outshine the great empires of antiquity.

Those on the Left who have made their bones engaging in polemics of American exceptionalism are engaged in the most profound kind of irony, in that their activities are primarily funded by the same plutocrats that have promulgated the very myth that they seek to dispel, wholly unaware that they are participating in a controlled opposition campaign.

This reality has been well understood since before the American Founding, and was articulated quite explicitly by historian Oswald Spengler in his seminal two-volume work, Decline of West, where he explained the nature of Homo economicus and its spiritual degradation:

“There is no proletarian, not even a Communist, movement that has not operated in the interest of money, in the directions indicated (more…)

BETE NOIRE 2016

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The social engineering of the US Presidential Election

by Brett I. Kier | 28 July 2016

All roads lead to Rome – or in this case, globalization. This election boils down to the question of means, not ends.

The setbacks of each of the presidential candidates are well-known by anyone with even a cursory interest or understanding of American politics. As such, these topics will not be discussed here. Instead, what will be offered is an examination of how the narrative of this election is being shaped, and what outcomes flow from the interpretations of these narratives.

The first, and perhaps most obvious, narrative is that an outlandish character named Donald Trump has been created in order to drive Hillary Clinton into the White House, (more…)

ON MASTERY – PART I

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The relationship between pain and pleasure in the development of mastery

by Brett I. Kier | 5 February 2016

Gaining pleasure and avoiding pain are perhaps the most fundamental motivators of human behavior. It has been rightly observed that too often we are in a state of pain avoidance rather than pleasure seeking. This phenomenon of the human psyche is one of the most significant obstacles in the cultivation and development of mastery. (more…)

SHADOW PUPPETS

allegory of the cave

Science, faith, propaganda, and the epistemological crisis of the postmodern age

by Brett I. Kier | 20 December 2015

Everywhere we hear of the postmodern age, where a crisis abounds, a crisis of faith in our institutions. Reasons for the development of this crisis of faith have been offered: the Kennedy assassination, Watergate, the Iran-Contra affair, 9/11, or things as culturally mundane as the revelation that Charles Van Doran participated in a fixed game show with the help of a television network. The problem with all of these explanations is that they purport to reveal (more…)

RADICAL AUTONOMY

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The philosophical foundations of discipline

By Brett I. Kier | Monday, 27 July 2015

What is clear in reviewing the different theorists of classroom discipline is that for the most part they are all addressing different aspects of human behavior for the ultimate purpose of creating a positive learning environment, which is why a strong argument can be made that each theorist is simply highlighting a different side of an infinitely-sided die. This is in part due to the schizophrenic nature of educational theory in general, but also speaks to the historical moment we are currently experiencing, where the individual and collective socio-cultural and economic realities are driving a great deal of the shift in students’ behavior. Because human behavior is to a large extent environmentally mediated, it is not surprising to see constant shifts in philosophy and approach about what are the most effective ways to create a cooperative learning environment.

Over the years, classroom discipline has been influenced in a number of ways by various theorists, creating a hodgepodge of philosophical approaches that all seem to agree on at least one fundamental point: (more…)